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Medical Device Security 2018

Medical Device Security 2018
What Are the Greatest Challenges, and How Can They Be Overcome?

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While funding and strategy development have increased for security overall, healthcare organizations are bombarded from all sides by security attacks. Due to the patient-safety risks, many feel particularly vulnerable when it comes to medical device security. This report—a collaborative effort between the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME), the Association for Executives in Healthcare Information Security (AEHIS), KLAS, and provider organizations—aims to examine the current state of the industry and identify best practices for improvement. 148 interviewed provider organizations shared how confident they feel in their medical device security strategies, the most common challenges they face, their perceptions of the security and transparency of major medical device manufacturers, and the best practices they leverage to overcome medical device security challenges.

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Key Findings

  1. Patient Safety a Top Concern with Unsecured Medical Devices
  2. Root Causes of Medical Device Security Struggles
  3. Manufacturer-Related Factors: Legacy Medical Devices a Universal Challenge
  4. Organizational Factors: Poor Asset Visibility & Ambiguous Security Ownership the Top Challenges
  5. Device Manufacturer Performance Insights: Security a Perceived Struggle for All Device Vendors; BD and Spacelabs Seen as Most Transparent
  6. Organization Best Practices
  7. Overall Healthcare Security Trends
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This material is copyrighted. Any organization gaining unauthorized access to this report will be liable to compensate KLAS for the full retail price. Please see the KLAS DATA USE POLICY for information regarding use of this report. © 2018 KLAS Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. NOTE: Performance scores may change significantly when including newly interviewed provider organizations, especially when added to a smaller sample size like in emerging markets with a small number of live clients. The findings presented are not meant to be conclusive data for an entire client base.