USE DATA TO UNLOCK THE POWER OF THE EHR

Arch Collaborative
Join hundreds of healthcare providers working together to revolutionize healthcare quality by improving the EHR experience



 



The Arch Collaborative is a group of healthcare organizations committed to improving the EHR experience.



Maximize Your EHR Experience

KLAS works with each member to improve their EHR experience by uncovering opportunities for change through standardized surveys and benchmarking.
KLAS meets with members regularly, and the whole Collaborative meets annually to facilitate learning from other healthcare organizations.
 
Satisfaction ratings for the Acute Care EMR market segment have been lower than the software average for over five years. The Arch Collaborative is working to change this.
Best in KLAS Rankings, 2014-2022


EHR SATISFACTION RESEARCH
Where It All Started


While sifting through our initial Collaborative data, we noticed a pattern that caused us to ask:
How can two organizations using the same EHR report such disparate satisfaction with the user experience?


Percent of Surveyed Clinicians Who Are Satisfied with Their EHR

Percent of Surveyed Clinicians Who Are Satisfied with Their EHR

 
Why is there a 62 percentage points difference between different organizations using the same EHR?


Conclusion

“The truth? All EHRs see a wide spread in user experience from organization to organization. Benchmarking your organization against similiar organizations allows you to find out if you have truly maximized your investment.
This insight led us to dig deeper into what factors are most likely to create satisfied EHR users.
Over and over, the data revealed that satisfied users:
  • Are able to personalize their EHR experience
  • Share ownership for EHR governance
  • Are expert users of their EHR solution
More insights like these continue to be uncovered as additional organizations decide to measure and collaborate. Benchmark against your peers to determine whether you have truly maximized your EHR investment.
Statisfied Users

quote "Without data, you're just another person with an opinion."

— W. Edwards Deming


Benefits of the Arch Collaborative
For Healthcare Providers


Become a member of the Arch Collaborative to:


  • Benchmark EHR satisfaction against similar organizations
  • Connect with and learn from other healthcare organizations
  • Improve clinician satisfaction with your EHR
  • Fine-tune your clinician education
  • Alleviate technology-related burnout
  • Deliver better care
98% of organizations see an improvement in EHR satisfaction when remeasured.

Provider
The Science of Improving the EHR Experience 2021, July 2021
Photo by Christina @wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

success stories
From the Members Themselves
Real stories from the front-lines. See how the Arch Collaborative made an impact with these provider organizations.


how to participate
Become a Member
Real leadership requires data. Put the insights of over 200,000 clinician respondents at 250+ provider organizations to use.


Number 1
Express your interest. Discuss membership options.

Number 2
Pick the membership that fits your needs.

View Plans & Pricing
 
hr See Sample Benchmark Survey
Number 3
Dive deeper into the research. Start seeing value.

Visit the Learning Center


250+
Provider organizations
and counting
14+
Healthcare IT companies
and counting
Become a Collaborative member. Start your EHR improvement journey today.
Benefits of the arch collaborative
For Healthcare IT Companies (Vendors)
Use Arch Collaborative findings to give your solutions the edge they need to excel.


Get Crucial Information

  • Key pain points using the EHR
  • Best practices that drive high user satisfaction
  • Tips for improving clinician efficiency

Proactively Optimize

  • Fix problems before they become detrimental
  • Help customers deliver better healthcare

Express Interest

  • Reach out to our vendor specialist if you have any questions or would like to participate.




Vendor Participation
By participating in the Collaborative, healthcare IT companies can dramatically reduce the time it takes to implement changes based on end-user feedback.

314e
3M
Aquity Solutions
athenahealth
Atos
Cerner
Chartis Group
Dedalus
DeliverHealth
Divurgent
Epic
EY
Goliath Technologies
Greenway Health
InterSystems
Medix
Nordic
uPerform




Report
KLAS article icon
Exploring EHR Satisfaction by Provider Specialty
Physicians and advanced practice providers who are very satisfied with the EHR are almost five times more likely to report plans to stay at their organization, compared to peers who are very dissatisfied (see chart below); this illustrates how impactful technology can be on the clinician experience. One of the ways organizations can target improvements for those who are less satisfied is to look at EHR satisfaction by specialty—there is currently a gap of about 30 points between the most satisfied specialty (hospital medicine) and the least satisfied specialty (ophthalmology). The goal of this report is to help readers understand this variation and learn some ways the gaps between specialties might be addressed. Note: Arch Collaborative respondents are asked to rate the main EHR solution used at their organization. For ratings on the ancillary EHR solutions designed for specific departments, visit the KLAS website. † Each individual clinician’s responses to the Arch Collaborative EHR Experience Survey regarding core factors such as the EHR’s efficiency, functionality, impact on care, and so on are aggregated into an overall Net EHR Experience Score (NEES), which represents a snapshot of the clinician’s overall satisfaction with the EHR environment at their organization. The NEES is calculated by subtracting the percent of negative user feedback from the percent of positive user feedback. An NEES can range from -100 (all negative feedback) to 100 (all positive feedback). EHR Satisfaction for Orthopedics & Cardiology Consistently Below Average across Vendors Examining how specialties score  compared to other users of their same EHR demonstrates that satisfaction can depend more on a user’s specialty than on which EHR is used and can help organizations pinpoint which specialties are most in need of extra focus. Vendor-specific specialty data is available only for Cerner and Epic users (other EHR vendors do not have large enough representation in the Collaborative to be broken out). In both customer groups, orthopedics and cardiology have some of the lowest scores compared to peers using the same EHR; regardless of the vendor’s average NEES, some common areas of frustration for these two specialties include functionality, ability to deliver quality care, and vendor delivery of a high-quality EHR. The specialty that scores the highest compared to each vendor’s average is also the same across Cerner and Epic—for both customer groups, hospital medicine providers report an NEES over 10 points higher than the average for their respective EHRs. These providers are particularly pleased with their workflow training, the EHR’s functionality, and how easy the EHR is to learn.   By implementing new EHR training, support, and governance programs, OrthoVirginia was able to improve their orthopedic providers’ NEES by 44 points. Some keys to success include: Creation of the Provider Support Specialist (PSS) program: Each provider has a touch point with a member of the PSS team every one or two weeks, resulting in greater EHR knowledge and efficiency. Implementation of an EHR governance structure: Modeled on Kaiser Permanente Northwest’s “Pyramid of Change,” OrthoVirginia’s governance creates structure and process for handling EHR change requests. Best Practices from Organizations That Buck the Satisfaction Trends A number of organizations that recently measured EHR satisfaction through the Arch Collaborative survey had abnormally high satisfaction in anesthesiology, cardiology, gynecology and obstetrics, and orthopedics. To understand the drivers of this unique success, KLAS conducted in-depth interviews with leaders from these organizations and also analyzed survey comments from their highly satisfied providers. Several common best practices emerged from this analysis. Additional details on what these organizations have done to improve satisfaction for their providers can be found in the full report. Individual involvement in EHR governance to better understand EHR changes and the reasoning behind them The ability for providers to ask the IT department, EHR analysts, or their peers for help with quick fixes and recommendations for being more efficient with the EHR Significant use of EHR personalization tools that enhance EHR use and make documentation easier Good EHR education, including required organization trainings and self-learning to increase EHR knowledge and understanding Specialty-Specific Workflow Training Tied to Higher Satisfaction with EHR Functionality Though it may take significant time and effort to build specialty-specific workflow training, providers who strongly agree their training was specialty-specific are almost 25 times more likely to agree that the EHR has the functionality they need. Both organizations and EHR vendors can help all providers find success with the EHR by ensuring that initial and ongoing education are tailored to the needs of different specialties. A case study from Kaiser Permanente Southern California outlines their efforts to improve both initial and ongoing EHR education programs by incorporating workflow-specific training. Clinicians attend education classes based on their specific work environment and receive training tailored to their unique needs. These education programs are then supported by rounding efforts. Infrastructure Improvements Could Help Specialties with Declining Satisfaction Several specialties—namely, endocrinology, pulmonology, ophthalmology, critical care, and anesthesiology—have seen notable declines in satisfaction (of 3–14 points) since the Arch Collaborative first began measuring satisfaction in 2017. The individual metrics that have seen the biggest decrease among these specialties are agreement that the EHR is reliable, agreement that the EHR has fast system response time, and agreement that the EHR enables patient safety. A recent Collaborative report on EHR response time and reliability demonstrated that industry-wide issues with system response time and reliability are creating significant barriers to clinician satisfaction and compromising patient safety. Addressing these issues by improving their broader IT infrastructure could be one way for organizations to turn the tide for specialties with declining satisfaction. What Is the KLAS Arch Collaborative? The Arch Collaborative is a group of healthcare organizations committed to improving the EHR experience through standardized surveys and benchmarking. To date, over 250 healthcare organizations have surveyed their end users and over 240,000 clinicians have responded. Reports such as this one seek to synthesize the feedback from these clinicians into actionable insights that organizations can use to revolutionize patient care by unlocking the potential of the EHR. To participate in the Arch Collaborative, go to klasresearch.com/arch-collaborative .
Report
KLAS article icon
Trust in Organization/IT Leadership 2022
† Each individual clinician’s responses to the Arch Collaborative EHR Experience Survey regarding core factors such as the EHR’s efficiency, functionality, impact on care, and so on are aggregated into an overall Net EHR Experience Score (NEES), which represents a snapshot of the clinician’s overall satisfaction with the EHR environment at their organization. The NEES is calculated by subtracting the percent of negative user feedback from the percent of positive user feedback. An NEES can range from -100 (all negative feedback) to 100 (all positive feedback). Trust in Organization/IT Leadership Has a Big Effect on Overall Experience Since Arch Collaborative research began in 2017, participating organizations have seen improvements in some areas and declines in others. Despite an overall increase in the average NEES (by 16 points), clinician satisfaction with organizational EHR delivery has decreased by about 4 percentage points. The difference in clinicians’ NEES is dramatic depending on how they rate their organization/IT leadership. On average, there is a difference of 124.1 points in NEES between clinicians who strongly agree their organization/IT leaders deliver well and those who strongly disagree. (The same trend appeared in the Arch Collaborative’s last report on this topic.) This is especially important because clinician burnout is on the rise—fewer clinicians (by about 9 percentage points) report no burnout compared to four years ago. Organizations that have earned high trust from their clinicians are uniquely set up to address burnout. Targeted Organizational Initiatives Drive Significant Satisfaction Improvement Some Collaborative organizations have measured clinician satisfaction both before and after implementing an initiative targeting a specific department or goal. On average, these organizations see significant improvement in NEES. Typical areas of focus for these initiatives include training (e.g., training sprints for specific areas, a full EHR training overhaul) and implementation of new software (EHRs and other supporting technology). In these measurements, the NEES of repeat respondents increases an average of 22 points. In contrast, repeat respondents whose organizations have measured multiple times but not for a specific improvement initiative see an average NEES increase of about 7 points. In addition to seeing an increased NEES, repeat respondents for organizations that conduct pre/post surveys also report higher satisfaction with all three EHR stakeholders. EHR Training, Efficiency, and Ease of Use Most Impact Trust in Organization/IT Leadership A Boruta analysis (an algorithm used to determine what variables are most important to a particular metric) shows that the factors most important to clinicians’ perception of their organization/IT leadership are initial and ongoing EHR training, followed by agreement that the EHR enables efficiency, is easy to learn, and enables quality care. Organizations that focus on making strides in these areas will see higher satisfaction and trust from clinicians. Utilizing Superusers Yields Higher Trust in Organization/IT Leadership One common effort organizations make to improve satisfaction with ongoing training is using EHR superusers. Organizations that leverage superusers deeply embedded in their various departments also see higher ratings for trust in organization/IT leadership. In Arch Collaborative case studies, organizations with standout EHR satisfaction share their keys to success, and there are currently 17 published case studies that relate to superusers. Below are some common recommendations (additional details are included in the Expanded Insights section of the report): Give every department/specialty a superuser Prior technical expertise isn’t necessarily needed Protected or paid time for superusers can be helpful Superusers are best deployed as a peer-to-peer aid resource to teach best practices, support adoption of personalization tools, and more Superusers are key to developing effective EHR education materials Superusers are extremely effective members of EHR governance boards EHR Support of Patient-Centered Care Affects Organization Satisfaction The EHR is supposed to be a tool that helps clinicians deliver high-quality care to patients. When clinicians feel the EHR doesn’t support high-quality, patient-centered care, they are much less likely to be satisfied with their EHR and their organization. A little over 44% of all Collaborative respondents disagree or are indifferent that their EHR enables patient-centered care. The Collaborative organizations that rate highest for agreement that the EHR enables patient-centered care also see much higher agreement (by 20 percentage points) that the organization and IT leadership deliver well, compared to organizations who score lower on this metric. For additional insights on how to make the EHR more patient-centric, see case studies from CentraCare Health , Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne , and UVA Health . What Is the KLAS Arch Collaborative? The Arch Collaborative is a group of healthcare organizations committed to improving the EHR experience through standardized surveys and benchmarking. To date, over 250 healthcare organizations have surveyed their end users and over 240,000 clinicians have responded. Reports such as this one seek to synthesize the feedback from these clinicians into actionable insights that organizations can use to revolutionize patient care by unlocking the potential of the EHR. To participate in the Arch Collaborative, go to klasresearch.com/arch-collaborative .